Humorous Quips & Artsy Stuff

makanidotdot:

old photos

Never not reblog Hobo Toph, especially when feels are involved.

uraniumraptor:

Follow-up update on the co-op piece. Still done together with corentinmonnier - here you see the different steps.

My darling made a thing.

Storyboards! Introducing Lorelai, the tonedeaf gadgeteer genius siren.
Check out ‘Bäckanäcken’ here.

Storyboards! Introducing Lorelai, the tonedeaf gadgeteer genius siren.

Check out ‘Bäckanäcken’ here.

Lots of room for funny faces when storyboarding.

Lots of room for funny faces when storyboarding.

Perpetual frowny face lady is back, and you have about ten seconds before she kicks your teeth in.
God, I love these brushes. <3

Perpetual frowny face lady is back, and you have about ten seconds before she kicks your teeth in.

God, I love these brushes. <3

Should be storyboarding, am instead drawing my five-year-old self.

Should be storyboarding, am instead drawing my five-year-old self.

Pandering to the masses? Who, me?

Pandering to the masses? Who, me?

More character concept, this time featuring Lorelai&#8217;s habit of making jewellery from discarded electronics.
Check out my group bachelor project.

More character concept, this time featuring Lorelai’s habit of making jewellery from discarded electronics.

Check out my group bachelor project.

backanacken:

A little look at what Fabian and Lorelai get up to in their daily lives.

Attitude and Spirit poses by Sara

Trying to capture the personality of the main characters this week. I like to think of Fabian’s personality as somewhere between aloof older sibling and high school queen bee.

Dear Mrs. Simone, what are (in your opinion) the top 5 mistakes people do, when creating comics? Thank you very much in advance.

gailsimone:

I don’t know a top five, per se, but there are some things I see over and over.

First, lack of establishing shots by both writer and artist. You need to set a scene. Set the scene well, and the readers don’t need more detail, they supply it already. Take a panel, show the setting. It’s vital.

Second, narrative thrust. I see a LOT of writers just doing the ‘cool’ moments, the little ideas they had in their head, little confrontations and witticisms, and then there’s a fight, and then done. 

That’s the same thing as an artist who draws every page as a pin-up. It’s fine, it’s not a story. You have to let the reader know WHO wants WHAT and HOW BADLY and WHY.

Otherwise you are putting racing stripes on a car with no wheels. 

Third, too much pointless, meandering chatter. If the artist did a good job, a big part of the WRITER’S job is to cut down on captions and dialog where possible. We’ve all read a comic where the eye simply isn’t drawn down the page because we SEE a dog, and we read a caption that LOOK THERE IS A DOG and the characters then discuss seeing the dog, and holy crap, is that really how people think comics are made?

Show the dog.

Then you can have your characters REACT to the dog, if necessary, not just say, LOOK A GOGGIE.

Finally, I think it’s important to take a risk every story, some kind of risk. This isn’t a rule for everyone, but I think otherwise, you become the ‘safe’ writer at best, and the ‘boring writer’ at worst.

Take a risk.

That’s four!

The wisdom of Gail Simone. These points also largely applies to filmmaking. animated or otherwise.

animationtidbits:

Mery Project -Rig Now Available for Download

Sweet baby Jesus on a tricycle, IT’S HERE!